Vision – Interpretation – Creation

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See Me Demo How I Create Create In-Camera Multiple Exposure Photos

Where: NorthWind Fine Arts, Saranac Lake – Studio Tour

When: July 1, 11am-6p

Anyone can point a digital camera or cell phone at something and get a “pretty good picture”. But that does not make art. Art comes from deep inside and the techniques used to relate your vision. As Thoreau once said: It’s not what you look at, it’s what you see that matters.” So photography is my “brush and canvas” with which I render my “vision” of what lies before me, and choreograph the three-partnered dance between my creative soul, my lens, and the subject.

I often make use of a technique in which I make multiple photographs of the same subject which I merge in-camera into a single digital image file to create a composite composition.   Sometimes the composition is the result of envisioning what I want the final photograph to look like, or what feeling or thought I want it to convey, and carefully selecting and placing each of the images in the camera’s frame in relation to each other. And sometimes it is done spontaneously and intuitively. I use this technique in shooting reflections; joining or contrasting two or more objects in different planes or spaces; photographing layers of texture, form or color; fine art human form photography; street photography and anywhere else the spirit moves me.

During the ArtWorks Studio Tour, I will be explaining how this technique was used to create some of my photographs that will be on display, as well as demonstrating how the technique is performed and, if time permits, perhaps allowing a few people to make an in-camera multiple exposure photograph using my camera, and then processing it in Lightroom and emailing them a jpeg of their image.

See my work : www.carlrubinophotography.com           www.instagram.com/carlrubinophotography

Questions?: carl@carlrubinophotography.com

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Abstract Art…What’s The Point?

There is nothing I love more in art than that which bears qualities of the abstract or abstract expressionism.  I think its appeal to me is that the presentation is unclear and uncertain and that it allows you to make your own exploration, unlimited by direction, guidelines or constraints of any kind.  They are not a constrained reality…They are an invitation that allows you to undergo, even if just briefly, a journey into yourself, your feelings, your “truth”.

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It is the abstract, the expressionistic, the uncertain, the vague and the mystical that teases me, that goads me, that tempts me, that challenges me to find a way to portray a subject or scene with my camera that presents a composition that invokes an exploration or conveys an emotion.

It is challenging, always.  And It is also often frustrating, as finding my “viewpoint” or “revelation” or the key “emotion” is often very illusive and even once the composition is discovered, the technique with which to render it is often slippery.

But sometimes it all comes together.  And, when realized, it provides a wonderful abstract duality.  The artist’s in envisioning and rendering it.   And yours as viewer, as you dance with it and unravel what you will from it.

As you look at abstract art, whether it is a painting, a sculpture or, in the case of my artwork a photograph, you may want to ask yourself questions like…What do I see in this image?  What is evident, and what is suggested or hiding in its depth?  Does it arouse any feeling or emotion in me?  What do I think of as I look at it?  And how do a series of these images complement or contrast with one another?

The invitations to experience, imagine and feel can be limitless in abstract art.  And sometimes, none of these explorations have a result, and sometimes you don’t even feel the impetus to ask yourself the questions.   Sometimes you just look at it and like it, or don’t… Abstract art. It’s an open invitation to dive in as deep as you like, or to just stand by the side of the pool and look at the shimmer as you walk by.If you’d like to experiment with looking at abstract art, just do a simple Google search.  Or, if you like, you can look at some of mine, perhaps starting with these…from my “Abstract Multiplicities” body of work  – http://bit.ly/2rfYgcD – a series of abstract photographs of peeling and distressed paint on various surfaces.  These photographic compositions are created by making a series of two or more images using a technique known as  in-camera multiple exposure, in which compositions are formed by photographing two or more exposures and merging them into one image file in the camera, creating a single abstract work.

Work of this nature can be entirely planned, with the final composition being filly conceived in advance, and with each contributing image in the composition being meticulously framed and placed with precision in the frame for each shot, or the work can be totally spontaneous and intuitive.

If the photograph shown here and this discussion arouse your interest in abstract photography, feel free to cruise around the rest of my website http://www.carlrubinophotography.com at the many other galleries of work, the majority of which contain at least some abstract photographs. Or do a google search for abstract art or abstract expressionism and enjoy what you find.

Have fun. After all, that’s what art is all about…Fun…

Choosing Unique Photography Or Other Art For Your Home Or Office – Rediscovering Your Own Individuality

If we really look at ourselves and our day-to-day existence most of us – myself included – would probably have to admit that, in the main, we are more or less “ordinary”.

We live in an ordinary house (though it may be very nice), put on ordinary clothes, drive an ordinary car to an ordinary job where work an ordinary amount of hours, come home and eat an ordinary dinner and then watch our ordinary tv shows until we fall asleep at an ordinary hour.

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Yet, the entire time we feel that there are things about us that are unique, either about our personalities, our beliefs, our feelings or our ideas and desires. It’s just that, when we look around at our own day to day surroundings, we don’t often happen to see things that remind us of our individuality.

So, just maybe, we owe it to ourselves to pick out something unique to focus on from time to time, and for our guests or visitors to focus on, to remind us of the unique qualities we possess in our sea of ordinariness. Something that represents, in some way, the individuality that we feel inside. And here’s where the part about art comes in.

We’re all familiar with the “typical” paintings and photographs that adorn countless walls in countless places. There’s the typical farmland scene, the typical mountain scene, the typical ocean scene and, oh, yea, don’t forget the countless typical lighthouses, pastures, lakes, sunrises, sunsets…

Not that there’s anything wrong with them. Some of them are, frankly, “drop dead gorgeous” and could well be as good or better than any photograph I’ll ever take. But, if you get where I’m going, they’re “ordinary”.

Not that there’s anything wrong with “ordinary”. In fact, most of us are probably fairly ordinary, ordinarily. But maybe it’s time to break out a bit, at least in one small way.

So maybe its time to honor our own individuality, to find a piece of art – whether it comes from a paintbrush, a camera, wood, stone or clay – that is as unique to you as the uniqueness that lives within each of us, or that evokes a special feeling in you when you spend time with it, and put it up on a wall or a shelf, or place it in a corner, of our home or office (or, go nuts, both) to remind us and those who come to see us, in some small way, each time it is viewed, of our unique qualities as well.

And, as a possible bonus, consider this. In some small way, when someone appreciates a unique piece of art they form a relational, artistic bond with the artist who created it from his or her own unique interpretation of the subject, or with the art itself and the interpretation they make of it or the feeling it brings to them. It is, indeed, a two way relationship. And, in this way, the circle becomes complete

Enjoy the path to rediscovering the uniqueness in you. The journey is as valid as what you find at the end of the road.

As a start, feel free to explore some of my photographic art from the abstract to the contemplative to unique interpretations of landscape work at www.carlrubinophotography.com And feel free to follow me on Instagram at www.instagram.com/carlrubinphotography.com to see what I post from time to time that often is not included on the website and Like my Photography only FB Page at http://www.facebook.com/carlrubinophotography

Carl

Photography and The Blues – Creating Within Constraints

The other day I was playing some improv blues on guitar and I realized that photography and the blues have much in common.

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In the blues genre, one is traditionally limited by a number of constraints within which to find creative expression. Twelve bars; the tonic, subdominant and dominant chord structure (I-IV-V); and one or two scales are pretty much the floor, walls and ceiling of a blues composition. It is within those “confines” that the blues musician must find a unique or convincing way to express themself. Some would argue that it is more difficult to find a unique creativity within those narrow confines than in, say, improv jazz or classical music. The good ones accept the challenge of the parameters of the genre and create some exceptionally creative and moving pieces of music. From Robert Johnson to Susan Tedeschi, the confines are the challenge within which their talent has shone and from which they have moved our spirits, not to mention our bodies.

And so it is with photography. In subject, composition and other aspects of creating a photograph, one must work within fixed parameters to create their “voice” or unique expression. The subject before you is fixed, be it a person, a landscape or a street scene. And the “frame” of your photograph is fixed by the film or sensor you are working with. Yes, you are free to choose your subject, where to point the camera, how to frame the composition and when to press the shutter button, as well as being free to choose from a plethora of technical elements, but you cannot change the physical aspects of the subject, the arrangement of the landscape, the colors before you, the lighting, etc. You must skillfully work with what is before you to bring about your unique expression that creates an artistic photograph, as opposed to a “snapshot”.

Painters, though the good ones are truly skilled in many respects and create what is truly a high expression of art, have no such limits. They are free to create the vision they “see” in their head without the confines of reality. Photographers, like the blues musician, must work within given fixed constraints. From Andre Kertesz to Mary Ellen Mark, the better photographers accept, and relish, the challenge to create unique works of self-expression and present emotion and meaning to their viewers.

An interesting parallel – photography and the blues – conjoined confines of excellence.

Think about this next time you listen to the blues or look at (or take) a photograph. The challenges of limitations.

If you’d like to see the photographs I create, visit my website http://www.carlrubinophotography.com and Follow me on Instagram http://www.instagram.com/carlrubinophotogaphy.com and Like my Photography only FB Page at http://www.facebook.com/carlrubinophotography

…Carl

If Mark Rothko Had A Camera…Creating Photographs in the Style of Mark Rothko’s Multiform Abstract Paintings

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Since I first saw one of his geometric, mulitiform or color-field abstract paintings many years ago I have been deeply impressed by Mark Rothko’s work. As a photographer leaning toward the abstract, I am challenging myself to create photographs that borrow from Rothko’s style of painting.

While the characteristics of his works of this genre changed over the years, and included both color and greytone pieces, Rothko’s works of this type most frequently were comprised of two or three dominant planes of color or grey-tones that softly and subtly merge, complement or contrast one another, sometimes “divided” by narrower bands of other color or grey-tone. An example of this type of Rothko’s work can be seen at http://www.markrothko.org/dark-over-light-earth.jsp.

A combined exhibition of Rothko’s “grey” works and famed photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto’s seascape photographs was recently presented in London’s Pace Gallery, drew much critical acclaim, and spawned a book. So the concept of a photographer’s interpretation of or inspiration from Rothko’s work, or of parallels to be drawn between Rothko’s multiform paintings and the work of some photographers is not new.

In fact, for some time I have been taking panning or “swiping” shots with long exposures to create blurs of otherwise static or relatively static subjects, such as mountains, beaches, open bodies of water and other subject matter, like the one pictured above. To my eye, images of this nature are quite beautiful, stimulating and satisfying in their own right. However, though some may see parallels between images such as these and Rothko’s work in that they result in non-focused colors laid in blocks one on top of the other, this technique does not produce an image that is sufficiently “Rothkoesque”, to my way of thinking, to constitute a sufficient “homage” to Mark Rothko.

So I am now setting out to create a body of work, perhaps steeped in abstract landscape photography but perhaps not, that will satisfy my quest to do in photography a project with sufficiently reflects Rothko’s inspiration, and which is significantly different from any of the photography that I have found by others of this nature to be considered unique.

This will be a project which evolves over a period of time. From time to time I will post images from this project either here on my blog, or on my Facebook Page http://www.facebook.com/CarlRubinoPhotography. As the project attains a sufficient enough maturity, I will post some of the images to my website at http://www.carlrubino.photoshelter.com. At some point, if I feel the project warrants it, I may even launch a Kickstarter campaign in connection with the project to create and promote a sufficient exhibition of the work and, perhaps, a book.

Take care
Carl

Sleepless In The Adirondacks – Empty Mindedness and the Thanksgiving Turkey

For some reason, I woke up this morning at about 3:00 am and could not fall back to   sleep, no matter how hard I tried.  So I started to think about the meaning of life.

The more I thought about it, the more I realized that I have absolutely no idea what the meaning of life is.  So, after about thirty seconds I gave up on that attempt.

Then, for some unknown reason, I spontaneously flashed on the idea of Thanksgiving, and how all the turkeys get axed so we can make pigs of ourselves and argue with each other over stupid things that we can’t change no matter how hard we try, like the outcome of an election.

So I decided I’d try to write something to put on my photography blog, since I haven’t added anything in about a week or so.  And I sat there trying to come up with something clever to write, but I got nowhere.

Then it hit me…The problem with all of these things is trying too hard, or maybe just trying… So what does any of this have to do with photography?  Actually, quite a lot.

More and more over the years I’ve come to realize that my best photographs come when I have not set out to capture a pre-meditated image of something but, rather, simply allowed my self to be in the place where a photographic opportunity might present itself if I remain empty-minded, without thought, and open to experience whatever reveals itself.

It is in this state of nothingness or empty mindedness that an image comes to me, as much as I come to it, without trying, without obsessing, without planning, without pre-visualizing and without trying to replicate something someone else has already done.

Just like the spontaneous thought about the turkey, it’s when you’re not trying that things come you.

So maybe I’ll take a lesson from my photography practice, get back into bed and just see what happens.  And later on I’ll just sit at the table, tune out the stupid arguments that are sure to ensue, and eat whatever happens to come in my direction…

Happy Thanksgiving…Carl

Choosing Unique Photography Or Other Art For Your Home Or Office – Rediscovering Your Own Individuality

If we really look at ourselves and our day-to-day existence most of us – myself included – would  probably have to admit that, in the main, we are more or less “ordinary”.

We live in an ordinary house (though it may be very nice), put on ordinary clothes, drive an   ordinary car to an ordinary job where work an ordinary amount of hours, come home and eat an ordinary dinner and then watch our ordinary tv shows until we fall asleep at an ordinary hour.

Yet, the entire time we feel that there are things about us that are unique.  It’s just that, when we look around at our surroundings, we don’t often happen to see things that remind us of our individuality.

So, just maybe, we owe it to ourselves to pick out something unique to focus on from time to time, and for our guests or visitors to focus on, to remind us of the unique qualities we possess in our sea of ordinariness.  Here’s where the part about art comes in.

We’re all familiar with the “typical” paintings and photographs that adorn countless walls in countless places.  There’s the typical farmland scene, the typical mountain scene, the typical ocean scene and, oh, yea, don’t forget the countless typical lighthouses, pastures, lakes, sunrises, sunsets…

Not that there’s anything wrong with them.  Some of them are, frankly, “drop dead gorgeous” and could well be as good or better than any photograph I’ll ever take.  But, if you get where I’m going, they’re “ordinary”.

Not that there’s anything wrong with “ordinary”.  In fact, most of us are probably fairly ordinary, ordinarily. But maybe it’s time to breakout a bit, at least in one small way.

And, as a possible bonus, consider this.  In some small way, when someone appreciates a unique piece of art they form a relational, artistic bond with the artist who created it from his or her own unique interpretation of the subject.  And, in this way, the circle becomes complete.

So maybe its time to honor our own individuality, to find a piece of art – whether it comes from a paintbrush, a camera, wood, stone or clay – that is as unique as the uniqueness that lives within each of us, and put it up on a wall or a shelf, or place it in a corner, of our home or office (or, go nuts, both) to remind us and those who come to see us, in some small way, each time it is viewed, of our unique qualities as well.

Enjoy the path to rediscovering the uniqueness in you. The journey is as valid as what you find at the end of the road.

Feel free to visit my  website http://www.carlrubino.photoshelter.com to see some examples of my take on abstract and unique interpretations of a variety of subjects.

Carl

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